Sista Maj to Release Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy on Adansonia Records

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 22nd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

sista maj

Adansonia Records has put out word that it will issue the new album from Swedish progressive instrumentalists Sista Maj, dubbed Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy — it’s bodies, us, humans, in case you were wondering — on LP next month. Space Rock Productions also released a CD of the band’s last album, the late-2016 double-disc Series of Nested Universes, and they may have a CD version of Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy as well, or there might not be one at all, but Adansonia‘s vinyl has the added appeal of two bonus tracks exclusive to it that aren’t available digitally.

Speaking of digitally, Sista Maj put the album out on their own last month via Bandcamp and you can stream it in its entirety — bonus tracks aside, of course — on the player below.

Dig:

sista maj Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy

We have new partners from Sweden’s capital + + + Sista Maj + + +

Their current album “Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy” will be out soon on Adansonia Records.

Sista Maj started as a trio: Andreas Axelsson on drums, Mikael Tuominen on bass and other stuff, Jonathan Segel on guitar, violin and some other musical stuff. Instrumental hypnotic intense psychedelic space rock in the great Northern European tradition, which ranges from Krautrock to the Swedish progg. The band usually came together to improvise, and sometimes they take those improvisations and re-work them. In 2017 Per Wiberg joined the band with his keyboards. Their latest release, “Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy” includes all four of them and a bit of Mattias Olsson (Änglagård, Pineforest Crunch, Necromonkey, etc.) as well.

Sista Maj – from left to right:
Jonathan Segel moved from the US to Sweden in 2012, he lives in Stockholm and has hooked up with several musicians there, including this grouping. He records and performs music under his own name, and continues to play and record with Camper Van Beethoven (mostly in the US) and the Øresund Space Collective (mostly in the EU). Andreas Axelsson is in several bands (Eye Make the Horizon, Lisa Ullén, AAM, etc.). Mikael Tuominen is as well (Kungens Män, Automatism, Fanatism, Eye Make the Horizon) and they’re all amazing. Per Wiberg joined us in 2017 to play keyboards, opening up their sound to new territories, another veteran of many bands including Opeth, Spiritual Beggars and Kamchatka.

The album will be released in mid-December as a DLP and includes two bonus tracks which will be only available on vinyl. Detailed infos coming soon.

Sista Maj is:
Andreas Axelsson: drums
Jonathan Segel: guitar, violin
Mikael Tuominen: bass
Per Wiberg: keyboards

https://sistamaj.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/adansoniarecords/
https://www.adansoniarecords.de/

Sista Maj, Localized Pockets of Negative Entropy (2018)

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My Diligence Set Jan. 25 Release for Sun Rose; New Song Streaming

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 22nd, 2018 by JJ Koczan

my diligence

I was listening to the new streaming My Diligence track just now as I was getting ready to write this post. I’ve never heard the Belgian band before. They had an EP out in 2014 and a self-titled LP in 2015 — where was I on it? well, I suck, so I was probably around here somewhere and just missed them — but my out-loud response to “Resentful” was to nod my head and say the word “solid.” You’ll hear why about two and a half minutes into the song.

“Resentful” opens the full-length Sun Rose, which will be released Jan. 25 on Mottow Soundz, and sets up a pretty broad cast of influences they’re working from, so this is the part where I tell you I’m interested to hear the rest of the record. If you are too, preorders are up now, and I’m quite sure there will be more audio unveiled before the record itself, so, you know, keep an eye out.

Here’s info from the PR wire:

my diligence sun rose

Belgian heavy psych trio MY DILIGENCE to release new album on Mottow Soundz | Stream and share new song ‘Resentful’ now!

Pre-order HERE

Rising up from the streets of Brussels, My Diligence is a band that in recent years have come to transcend rock in their native Belgium with a skill and ease reminiscent of their transatlantic peers.

For fans already in the know, the progressive rock aplomb of established acts like Torche, Helmet and Elder resonate wildly in their sound. Big, bold and high in intensity, the Belgian trio deliver a non-stop, ass kicking brand of no-nonsense rock ‘n’ roll that scorches the sky, while leveling the playing field.

The success of their 2014 EP, Who Killed The Driver, along with their self-titled debut album from 2015 showcased as much, and at the same time laid down the foundations for Sun Rose, their eagerly awaited follow-up album, due for release this January on Mottow Soundz. Recorded at Studio Pyramide by producer François Vincent (Romano Nervoso, Thot), Sun Rose features a heavy mix of riffs – bigger and more bombastic than ever – interwoven with sincere lyrics and unforgettable grooves, like those found on ‘Resentful’, and capture the trio’s fresh and exciting ideas around how they feel rock should sound. As drummer Gabriel Marlier explains:

“‘Resentful’ was actually the first song we wrote when we started writing our second album. We wanted to push things forward and become heavier than ever and this song in particular signals a rebirth of My Diligence. My Diligence Mk. II. After our previous bassist’s departure we just wanted to two guitarists, one drummer and a chance to get rid of the past and focus on the future. The song is about addiction and we had no doubt about it, it had to open Sun Rose.”

Fully realised and breath-taking in its execution, Sun Rose is a remarkable take on twenty-first century rock ‘n’ roll and one that will capture the hearts and ears of those seeking more.

My Diligence’s new album, Sun Rose, will be released on Friday 25th January 2019 on Mottow Soundz and the band will host an official release party at Botanique, Brussels on Wednesday 30th January – https://www.botanique.be/fr/activite/my-diligence-s-o-r-o-r-300119

Album art by Elzo Durt – www.elzodurt.com

Recorded at Studio Pyramide by François Vincent
Mixed at Studio DHEE by Kasper De Sutter
Mastered at MyRoom par Raphaël Bovey

TRACK LISTING:
1. Resentful
2. Hunt the Hunter
3. Backstabber
4. An Asteroidal Arrow
5. Flying Poney
6. Lecter’s Song
7. So Pretty So Cruel
8. Serpentine
9. Unreal

MY DILIGENCE:
John Sailor – Vocals, Guitars
François Peeters – Guitars
Gabriel Marlier – Drums

http://www.facebook.com/mydiligence
https://www.instagram.com/mydiligence/
https://twitter.com/mydiligence
https://vi.be/mydiligence
https://mydiligence.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MottowSoundz
https://twitter.com/mottowsoundz
https://www.mottowsoundz.com/

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Review & Full Album Stream: Foghound, Awaken to Destroy

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

foghound awaken to destroy

[Click play above to stream Foghound‘s Awaken to Destroy in its entirety. Album is out this Friday, Nov. 23, on Ripple Music.]

It’s Foghound saying, “okay, let’s go.” And they do. Immediately, the impression Awaken to Destroy (their second for Ripple Music, third overall) gives is of continuing the thread of aggressive, sweeping heavy rock the Baltimore four-piece conjured on The World Unseen (review here) in 2016. A high-paced opening salvo begins with the title-track, and “Awaken to Destroy” seems to be a tailor-made opener for a live set. It brings in all three of the band’s vocalists — drummer Chuck Dukehart and guitarists Bob Sipes and Dee Settar — and launches the band’s third LP with a surge of energy that continues through the sharp and catchy “Known Wolves,” which follows. Sharp production from Frank “The Punisher” Marchand makes its presence known right away in the echo around the vocals and general largesse of tone from Sipes and Settar and former bassist Rev. Jim Forrester, whose late-2017 murder doesn’t exactly cast a pall over Awaken to Destroy, but is certainly present as part of the context in which the record arrives.

Front to back, the album is a good time, and if you listened to the centerpiece interlude “AVE!” and didn’t know that’s Forrester playing the acoustic guitar or that the subsequent “Keep on Shoveling” was released as a benefit single for his family and written in light of the medical issues he suffered through before his death, or that it’s his spoken word in the song itself, it’s easy to breeze through Awaken to Destroy and dig it for what it is: a willfully kickass heavy rock record full of tight performances, smart songcraft and a more dynamic sound than Awaken to Destroy had on offer that brings back some of the groove of Foghound‘s 2013 debut, Quick, Dirty and High (review here), without repeating that album in style or tone.

Hooks in songs like “Known Wolves,” “Keep on Shoveling” and “Gone up in Smoke” do well to carry the listener through the 11-track/41-minute outing as “Filthy” touches on social commentary, “Cut the Cord” brings the charge to an almost frenetic level ahead of the dynamic shifts in “In Due Time,” both of which remind of when Mike Dean stepped back up to front C.O.C. on their self-titled, and the quieter “Staring Down the Demons” presents an organ-laced examination of inner and outer turmoil. There’s further departure as jam-rooted closer “Death Will Tremble” taps a groove like self-titled-era Clutch with an edge of psychedelia in the guitar and keys that keeps a strong foundation as it should in the bass and drums, so yes, Awaken to Destroy handles its business in that destructive regard, but is informed by more than just the initial burst. The fact that Forrester was killed while it was being made, once you know it, is kind of inescapable.

foghound photo shane gardner

That is, there’s no way around it, and I’m not sure there should be, either on an emotional or a sociopolitical level when one considers gun violence even outside the seemingly constant stream of mass-shooting headlines. Frankly, it’s to Foghound‘s credit that Awaken to Destroy exists at all. It can’t have been an easy task to finish it, particularly for Dukehart, who was a bandmate of Forrester‘s in Sixty Watt Shaman as well, but the drummer’s vocals end up as a standout element in the material, and he seems to take a forward position in that regard with complement from Settar and Sipes. Having three vocalists — plus Forrester‘s contributions here in that regard and those on the opening two tracks from current bassist Adam Heinzmann, who’s known for his work in Internal Void and whose CV also includes stints in Pentagram and War Injun — only makes Foghound more of a powerhouse able to pull off shifts in mood and melody in addition to those of rhythm and tempo. Perhaps the starkest example is the turns from “AVE!” to “Keep on Shoveling” and then “Staring Down the Demons,” but the truth is Awaken to Destroy is full of deftly-composed changes that are nonetheless positioned for a clear A/B LP-style across-album flow.

It would be easy to write a thinkpiece about Forrester‘s murder and what a tragedy it was. And likewise, it would have been easy for Foghound to say, well, that’s that, nix the album entirely and either go back and re-record the material, write new songs, or not. Awaken to Destroy represents the harder path. “Keep on Shoveling” is a song about perseverance, and while the lyrics were written thinking about their bassist’s plight in another context — Forrester discussed his medical issues and time in a coma in an interview here — and the album that surrounds that single song is the manifestation of that mindset. This is the sound of Foghound, shoveling. And it fucking rocks. It’s an absolute triumph for the fact that it exists, yes, but what’s more, these songs represent the finest work the band has done to-date, and they already have two outings of righteous heavy rock to their credit. It’s a refusal to be consumed by loss. The cliché is to say that “Band Member X would want us to carry on,” but that’s a cliché for a reason.

I won’t attempt to feign impartiality here — this guy got fucking murdered. Gunned down outside of a tattoo shop. And instead of losing themselves in grief and being torn apart by the sheer senselessness of that, Foghound have stepped up and delivered a record that not only pays tribute to his memory but brings together the strongest elements of their approach in songwriting and execution and pushes their particular take on heavy rock forward from where it could be found just two years ago. It’s a multi-tiered victory and an album that, if they were going to continue at all, absolutely needed to happen. No doubt Foghound‘s fourth full-length, whenever it might arrive, will be marked as well by the changes they’ve been through — lineup being the least of them — but to even get to that point, they will have already managed to come through adversity the likes of which would indeed destroy lesser bands. Foghound, in contrast, could hardly seem more awakened than they do in this material.

Foghound on Thee Facebooks

Foghound on Twitter

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Foghound website

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Viaje a Ixtlán Post New Single “El Aliado” Ahead of 2LP Release

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Argentina-based progressive heavy psychedelic rockers Viaje a Ixtlán have a new single out now as a name-your-price download. The four-piece band who formed in 2011/2012 depending on where you look had the prior single “Sueño de Agua” out in August, and “El Aliado” follows as a fellow precursor to a 2LP release that’s due out sometime soon. I’d guess that means next year, but you never know. Either way, the track has an experimentalist edge in its weirdo vocal effects, and as the band embark on this ambitious project, they do so with two albums behind them of adventurous prog that have built up to it. I’m not sure when the album will be out, but a name-your-price single, let alone two, is a good way to lead into it, and if “El Aliado” is giving a feel for the kind of open-minded sonic palette they’re working with, that should be a pretty wide swath they cover throughout the record.

An interesting song that seemed well worth sharing. Hope you dig it.

Info from the PR wire:

viaje a ixtlan el aliado

El Aliado is part of the upcoming double release by Viaje a Ixtlán. Each album is a side from the same coin, two faces of the same band during a process of reorganization. The songs from the first album, such as “El Aliado”, are centered around instrumental passages inspired by the krautrock from the late 60’s, where the melodic motifs are carried by layers of synthesizers, riding over bases of traditional rock using the repetition as a way of generating the sensation of a mantra, the stillness, the calm, leaving the listener alone with the flow of the music.

Music by Viaje a Ixtlán
Arrangements by Viaje a Ixtlán.
Recorded on Estudios Zar and Black House by Damian Colaprette between December 2016 and February 2017.
Mixing and Mastering on Estudio Black House by Damian Colaprette.
Produced by Mariano Bertolazzi and Andrés Raffo.
Artwork by Matías Ridolfi.

Viaje a Ixtlán lives in constant movement, in constant change, stepping out of our comfort zone in each step, experimenting and chewing out each sound that influenced us so much. Taking as a starting point instrumental and dark passages, the band has developed a personal aesthetic wheres the songs get fused with the sound experimentation and the electric volatility.

Viaje a Ixtlán is:
Mariano Bertolazzi – Bass
Andrés “el Jeque” Raffo – Synth
Fernando Figueiras – Guitar
Leonardo Aldegani – Drums

https://www.instagram.com/viaje_a_ixtlan/
https://www.facebook.com/ViajeAIxtlan/
https://viajeaixtlan.bandcamp.com/

Viaje a Ixtlán, “El Aliado”

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The Sabbathian Announce Jan. 25 Release for Latum Alterum

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

the sabbathian

Following the debut EP Ritual Rites, which Svart issued in 2014, The Sabbathian will issue their debut long-player on Jan. 25. The group has pared down from a trio to a two-piece since the EP, with multi-instrumentalist Chad Davis (GnuJenzeitsHour of Thirteen, so many others) and Norewgian-native vocalist Anette Uvaas Guldbransen (Nàttsòl, Mäctätus) as its sole inhabitants — though Liv Kristine of Leaves’ Eyes makes a guest appearance as well — and if the band itself positions the songs more in line with classic metal and doom. A comparison to early Bathory is always a mixed bag: How early are we talking? But with that intrigue added, I’m only more on the hook for listening to the album when the time comes.

Art and info came down the PR wire:

the sabbathian latum alterum

THE SABBATHIAN set release date for SVART debut album

Today, Svart Records sets January 25th, 2019 as the international release date for The Sabbathian’s highly anticipated debut album, Latum Alterum, on CD and vinyl LP formats.

The words “highly anticipated” come quickly to mind when talking of the US-Norwegian project The Sabbathian and the chance that there will be new material from them. The band, formed by Chad Davis (Hour of 13 and many more) and Anette Uvaas Guldbrandsen (Nàttsòl), released their debut EP, Ritual Rites, on Svart Records in 2014. The duo’s personal approach to old-school doom won over many metal hearts, and the wait for new material is over in January 2019.

The Sabbathian’s debut full-length, Latum Alterum, is scheduled for release on January 25th on LP, digital, and limited double CD (including Ritual Rites EP on CD for the first time). The album is a considerably darker affair compared to the EP, a step away from the origins of doom metal and towards the heavier vistas traversed by Nordic metalmongers such as Bathory or Candlemass. Vocalist Anette Uvaas Guldbransen describes the album thus: “The overall theme can be described as slightly morbid, as it is very much about passing over to the other side – latum alterum. The odd one out is the song ‘Embrace The Dark,’ which retains the sound of the EP. The intro and outro tracks are meant as a way of blessing the souls on their journey.”

“The way we work on the music takes time,” adds Guldbransen. “Chad would send me the music and I then work my way through the songs. As the music is quite different now, I must admit I had quite a struggle at first with some of the tracks. My best friend Liv Kristine Espenæs has joined me on one track, mainly because I thought her voice would lift the song and also because I love her voice. I have sung on several songs with her ex-band Leaves’ Eyes, and now I felt it was her turn to sing on something I made.”

First track premiere and preorder info to be revealed shortly.

Tracklisting for The Sabbathian’s Latum Alterum
1. Requiem… (Intro)
2. The Brightest Light
3. Liti Kjersti
4. Head Of A Traitor
5. One Night Of Cruelty
6. Embrace The Dark
7. Evig Hvile / Libera me… (outro)

www.facebook.com/thesabbathianband
https://thesabbathian.bandcamp.com
www.svartrecords.com
www.facebook.com/svartrecords
www.twitter.com/svartrecords

The Sabbathian, Ritual Rites (2014)

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Review & Full Album Stream: Pale Divine, Pale Divine

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

PALE DIVINE S/T

[Click play above to stream Pale Divine’s self-titled album in full. It’s out Nov. 23 on Shadow Kingdom Records.]

The level of coincidence is somewhat astounding. Pennsylvania’s Pale Divine are well past the 20-year mark since forming in 1995. By now the stuff of Chesapeake regional legend, their first demo arrived in 1997 (was also reissued in 2008). Their fourth and otherwise most recent album, Painted Windows Black (review here), was released early in 2012, and a short time after it came out, founding drummer Darin McCloskey and guitarist/vocalist Greg Diener recruited Ron “Fezz” McGinnis to play bass. McGinnis, who’s known for his work in the mostly-instrumental Admiral Browning, as well as Bailjack, the more extreme Thonian Horde and a host of others, was not a minor pickup. In stage presence, tone and complement to Diener‘s vocals, McGinnis was a personality shift for the band that was far more significant than the phrase, “he’s their eighth bassist,” would lead one to believe.

Now, as Pale Divine make a definitive statement by issuing their fifth LP, an eight-track/46-minute self-titled, through Shadow Kingdom Records, the situation is oddly similar. Always a trio save for one stint around the time of their third album, 2007’s Cemetery Earth, Pale Divine‘s Pale Divine lands, gorgeous in tone and as downtrodden in spirit as it is righteous in its traditionalism, as heard on cuts like opener “Spinning Wheel” and the extended blues-informed pieces “So Low” and “Shades of Blue,” just as the trio welcomes Dana Ortt of Beelzefuzz — in which Diener and McCloskey both play, the latter as a founding member, the former as a pickup for their second record — on guitar. A self-titled has a tendency to be a clear signal on the part of a band saying “this is who we are.” And tracks like the rocking “Bleeding Soul” and the penultimate “Silver Tongues,” which has a bounce worthy of the band’s one-time contemporaries in Spirit Caravan, live up to that. But the timing. Pale Divine put out their fourth album and made a considerable change in their dynamic, and now with their fifth album they’ve done the same thing.

Does that make Pale Divine moot? In a word: no. The songs are the key. In the fullness of the record’s emotional heft and across-the-board sonic execution, the way it slides into classic doom because it is that very same classic doom, nodding at Trouble on “Chemical Decline” before just nodding, period, in the early going of the subsequent “So Low” — which in its second half also features a very long guitar solo, making it easy to remember on a linguistic level too — it’s still a process of Pale Divine defining who they are in a specific point in time. From the early signal of a changed mindset with McGinnis joining Diener on vocals for the Pentagram-informed apex of “Spinning Wheel” to the Sabbathian chug, compressed lead tone and sleek groove of “Curse the Shadows” of the also-dual-voiced “Curse the Shadows,” which dates back at least five years to a demo from 2013Pale Divine emphasize the outside-of-time nature of trad doom even as they put their own stamp on the classic style with the force of Diener‘s vocals, the understated but always locked-in drumming of McCloskey and the flash in McGinnis‘ basslines — as heard in the later gallop on that same “Curse the Shadows” — as well as the fluidity of their songwriting.

pale divine

Pieces like “So Low,” which sources its lyrical depression from within and without, or “Bleeding Soul,” with its uptempo hook in the line, “A bleeding soul will find no rest,” or the initial showoff rumble of low end in “Shades of Blue” and the instantly familiar chorus there that follows as the eight-minute track unfolds, are resonant in their downer spirit and stately in their delivery. But one of the accusations often leveled at traditional doom is that it’s staid and dry in its delivery and that applies even less to Pale Divine than it ever has to Pale Divine‘s work before. With the flourish of Southern-style and progressive acoustic/electric guitar layers on closer “Ship of Fools” and the smoothness of their rhythmic and tempo shifts as shown in “Chemical Decline” and “So Low,” as well as Diener‘s vocal delivery across the release and what McGinnis brings in periodic complement to that, there’s nothing but a genuine soulfulness to Pale Divine‘s Pale Divine, and it’s not just boozy self-defeat, though there’s a bit of that also. “Silver Tongues,” “Shades of Blue,” “Spinning Wheel” have, to go with the subtle changes in approach between them, a sense of looking beyond oneself. Not like there isn’t plenty of doom to behold if you have the eyes to see it. Clearly Pale Divine do.

Okay, but then what? What’s the resolution? Well, one could argue there’s hope along with a resigned sensibility in the interwoven soloing on “Ship of Fools,” and positioned as that is at the end of the album — doesn’t seem unreasonable to think that a band who seem well set to hit the quarter-century mark would make a purposeful choice on a closer — with a long fadeout that caps the LP as a whole, it carries a kind of “keep marching” message. You trod on, because what else is there? Fair enough, but it seems on the whole that Pale Divine is less directly about examination and critique than it is the simple act of conveying the experience of living it. Consider the lyrics of “So Low,” with Diener seeming to recount on the page his own lack of inspiration and pervasive depression, the distancing of the self from one’s own existence. Maybe there’s an element of catharsis in the expression, but the songs don’t go so far as to portray that, nor could they, since if it’s there, it’s an after-effect. The point is that what Pale Divine are doing is, to an extent, what they’ve always done in bringing to life the tenets of classic American doom metal while retaining the central identity of who they are as individual players and as a group.

For that, Pale Divine could hardly be more relevant, regardless of the fact that the lineup has changed since it was recorded. Their dynamic may indeed shift with Ortt as a member alongside DienerMcCloskey and McGinnis, but that’s a question for live shows and however many years down the road when and if there’s another album, because who the hell knows what might happen now and then. Pale Divine‘s self-titled earns the name by being a sincere representation of who the band is in its moment, and while moments are inherently fleeting, the poise and maturity of their craft and the passion so rife in their delivery are essential components of what makes them who they are, who they’ve become over their years together. That’s always been in flux and it still will be, but in context, Pale Divine reminds of that too, and so all the more stands as the epitome of their persona.

Pale Divine on Thee Facebooks

Pale Divine website

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Shadow Kingdom Records website

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Thunderbird Divine Post “Djinn au Jus” Video; Magnasonic Due Jan. 11

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

Thunderbird Divine (Photo by Dante Torrieri)

I don’t know what the hype is ultimately going to be like for Thunderbird Divine when it comes to their debut album, Magnasonic, but I do know that the record resides in its own niche of psych-informed classic stoner and sludge rock, and I do know that there’s more going on with it the more one listens. It’s been on my list of most anticipated albums pretty much since the band announced they’d gotten together last year as formed by members of Philly-based outfits Skeleton Hands and Wizard Eye. Now that we’re at the point of preorders going up Dec. 7 ahead of the Jan. 11 release, I find I’m all the more curious to know what the response will be.

As has been their method all along, Thunderbird Divine are giving a teaser for Magnasonic by unveiling a video clip for a song that’s not on the album. If you need an extra second to wrap your head around that — I do — feel free to take it. The latest one, “Djinn au Jus” taps into Snoop Dogg‘s similarly-titled single a from quarter-century ago while retaining its psychedelic flair worthy of the old sci-fi imagery that accompanies.

Album art and details came down the PR wire:

thunderbird divine magnasonic

THUNDERBIRD DIVINE release date!

Philly’s psychedelic space hippy enclave, Thunderbird Divine, has set an official domestic release date of January 11, 2019 for its debut album, Magnasonic, with Salt of the Earth Records (https://www.saltoftheearthrecords.com/). The offering, a 30-plus-minute exploration of riffs and psychedelia, features custom art design by the band’s bassist, Adam Scott.

“The inspiration for Magnasonic’s artwork stems from classic optical and psychedelic line art,” Scott explains. “It then evolved to the stargate space exploration of graphic symbolism, which we feel reflects the music’s loud vibrance.”

Connecticut-based Salt of the Earth Records, home to releases by Earthride, When the Deadbolt Breaks, Atala, Rifflord and more, is enthusiastic about this upcoming release.

“Everything about this album is beautiful, focused and original,” says Scott Harrington (Salt of the Earth Records). “From the instrumentation, songwriting, performances and recordings to the sacred geometry in the art direction, everything about Magnasonic speaks to the depth and talent of Thunderbird Divine. This will set the bar for bands to come.”

Produced by the band and recorded at both Ted Richardson at TedAudio in Philadelphia (www.facebook.com/TedAudio) and Charles Newman (who also mixed the album) at Cottage Sounds Unlimited in Brooklyn (https://www.facebook.com/cottagesounds/), Magnasonic shows the quartet, which coalesced in March of 2017, is not willing to be pigeonholed as a strictly stoner/doom rock band. Featuring Scott on bass and guitars, Flynn Lawrence on guitars and additional instrumentation, Mike Stuart on drums and percussion and Erik Caplan on guitars and various instruments,Thunderbird Divine went for an unexpectedly broad tonal variety with Magnasonic.

“A first record is often considered a band’s mission statement,” Caplan says. “We feel a lot of bands’ first releases set the tone for their careers as heavy, funky, trippy, fast or sludgey, and once they do that, any deviation from the initial sound can be perceived as false or a slacking in its rock responsibilities. We wanted come out of the gate with something diverse but representative. We wanted to leave ourselves with plenty of sonic options for the future.”

Layered with unlikely elements like marxophone, electric sitar, piano and a variety of synths, Thunderbird Divine is unlikely to be stylistically shackled in upcoming releases.

“This album pulls out a lot of stops and frees us from genre limitations,” says Stuart. “After this debut, our next record could be total Motorhead worship, and anyone who hears this one first should be able to hear how we got there. Not that we’ll necessarily do that, but it’s certainly an option.”

As with the band’s previous press releases, Thunderbird Divine once again offers listeners a non-album track with a promotional video. The band’s newest video track, “Djinn Au Jus,” is an unconventional pairing of early ’90s R&B with ’70s arena rock instrumental explorations. The self-recorded song was set to video by drummer/percussionist Stuart.

“The story continues here,” Stuart explains. “We’re moving forward; onward and upward. We’re setting the tone for Magnasonic with these short songs and videos.”

Advance orders for Magnasonic start December 7, 2018 at www.saltoftheearthrecords.com

https://www.facebook.com/thunderbirddivine
https://www.instagram.com/thunderbird_divine/
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Thunderbird Divine, “Djinn au Jus” official video

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Orange Goblin Confirm UK Shows, Fests and More for 2019

Posted in Whathaveyou on November 21st, 2018 by JJ Koczan

orange goblin (Photo by Alex Francis)

London heavylords Orange (fuckin’) Goblin (baby!) haven’t really announced and massive-stretch tours for 2019, and my understanding is they might do a few weeks here and there at some point and leave it at that. They say they have more to come and I have no trouble believing it.

I don’t need to tell you that if Orange Goblin are in a place and there’s a stage then that’s where you want to be. I mean, if they’re out to dinner or something, you can probably leave them alone, but given the stage, then yeah. Go fucking see Orange Goblin.

Their three UK shows for Jan.-Feb. are newly-announced, and among the list of dates, expect more festivals to come and take particular note of the HRH Doom v. Stoner fest in Sheffield next September. If you get a chance, chase down the full lineup of that thing, because it’s monstrous. Orange Goblin sit atop it as headliners, which is precisely where they should be.

Here’s what’s currently confirmed:

orange goblin UK shows poster

Tickets for our 3 UK shows in January and February are now on sale, as are tickets for all other 2019 shows that have been announced so far. Here is a recap of what we have coming up next year and there is a lot more still to come! This weekend we play our last show of 2018 when we headline the Dome of Rock Festival in Salzburg, Austria.

26.01 – Brudenell Social Club, Leeds, UK
08.02 – KK Steelmill, Wolverhampton, UK
09.02 – o2 Academy 2, Liverpool, UK
21.03 – Tapper Club, Tallinn, Estonia
22.03 – Serdce, St. Petersburg, Russia
23.03 – Aglomerat, Moscow, Russia
06.04 – Faster & Louder Fest, Eindhoven, Netherlands
11.05 – HRH Road Trip, Ibiza, Spain
18.11 – Manorfest, Keighley, UK
23.06 – Graspop Metal Meeting, Dessel, Belgium
29.06 – Full Force Festival, Ferropolis, Germany
05.07 – Oltrasuoni Festival, Dro, Italy
06.07 – Traffic Club, Rome, Italy
07.07 – Cueva Club, Cagliari, Sardinia
28.09 – HRH Doom V Stoner IV, Sheffield, UK

…..plus more to come!

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http://www.orange-goblin.com/
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www.spinefarmrecords.com/

Orange Goblin, “Burn the Ships” and “Acid Trial” live Oct. 26, 2018

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